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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN 22
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
filner sworn in this month as mayor of san diego and served for 20 years. representative laura richardson served for five years from the 37th district. representative pete stark, outgoing dean of our delegation was elected in 1972 and served more than 40 wreers from the 13th district. representative lynn woolsey served for 20 years from the 6th congressional district. much kk said about the distinguished careers of our departing colleagues, but i would like to offer a few remarks of the work i have joined them during their time here in the congress. representative howard berman has served the house for 30 years and i was honored to name him among my closest friends in this body. during his service, he worked on a wide of variety of issues and known as a champion of human rights and standing up for middle class, working class and for the poor in our country. as chair of the foreign affairs committee from 2007 to 2008, mr. berman made great progress on behalf of the less fortunate. he was a leader in securing reauthorization of our global hiv-aids program to help provide access to preventiv
are mine, some of and the laura bushs's key is sense of what christmas felt like in other administrations. of course keeping with past holiday traditions, we have our annual white house gingerbread house. have you guys seen that yet? our executive pastry chef and his team did a phenomenal job. this white house looks kind of real. what do you all think? we got a thumbs up there. it is beautiful. it white house holiday staple since the 1960's, this year's house weighs nearly 300 pounds. it is made to resemble granite so he did some kind of technique and it even includes chandeliers that light up. it glows. like rudolph's nose. it is beautiful and we have a little red book of first lady garden with all the details in a giant bow. that basically represents bows standing in the house. h beau's standing in the ouse. also have a special activity prepared for the young people who visit the white house this year. we thought it would be fun to give them a book market checklist that instructs them to find all of the hidden demint located in eight rooms in the white house. we hope that will keep kids
first lady laura bush. >> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the honorable john boehner. >> ladies and all men, good afternoon and welcome to the capital. this is a great day for the american people, and we are happy to welcome you here today. gold medals are the highest level of appreciation for distinguished achievement. the first congressional gold medal was awarded to general george washington in 1776 for liberating the city of boston. today, we will present a congressional gold medal to aung san suu kyi in recognition of her efforts to liberate the people of burma. today, we celebrate her steadfast commitment to democracy, stability, and human dignity, and we do so in a manner worthy of her ideals. nancy pelosi initiated the measure of awarding this metal and republican george w. bush signed into law. his wife, former first lady laura bush, is with us today, as is her predecessor, secretary of state hillary clinton. coming together in mutual respect, a step from the chambers where we passionately debate the issues of th
in the following segment. laura is in louisville, kentucky, on the independent line. caller: good morning. what bothers me is when people say they actually can not find work and they have been on unemployment for 20 months, whatever they can get, and i will tell you my husband lost his job five years ago. he was with a company for 23 years. immediately we went into survival mode. we thought about what we could do to reduce bills, simplify our lifestyle in case he could not find a job, and in between he took jobs well below his skill level, temporary work -- whenever he could find. when he finally found a good job, they wanted to know what he had been doing in between the time he left his job and found a new job. the people that have been unemployment all of these months and they say they cannot get temporary work, i do not believe it. host: how long was your husband on unemployment insurance for? caller: when you find temporary work, you can go off of unemployment, and when that ends, you could go back on. i want to say he was on maybe six months at the absolute most because he was taking tempo
black caucus member, laura richardson, she has many accomplishments during her brief time. she has worked hard to improve our nation's infrastructure and been advocate for inclusion of minority and women-owned businesses and opened up economic opportunities and strengthened our schools. i know she is going to move forward to make more contributions in public service because she is focused and dedicated elected official. i have to pay tribute to my sister, lynn woolsey and i can't say what a bittersweet season this is after seeing you work so many issues. lynn woolsey has made sure that this body recognizes that peace is patriotic. and she has spoken 444 times on the floor as it relates to the needs to bring our young men and women home. and i look forward to our continuing work. she has been a role model for me. and i have to say finally in conclusion, she understands the importance of the safety net and brought the perspective that comes from relying on public assistance during lean times in her life and gave me the courage to talk about my time on public assistance, which was so
to laura. caller: i have two comments to make. the first is, the bush tax cut entitlements were supposed to be temporary. i remember when they were argued, and as far as i'm concerned, republicans live at that time. they never intended it to be temporary. they intended it to starve the government, which is a constitutional government. that makes me very angry. the other point i have to make is that i'm one of the long- term unemployed. right now, all of these discussions are noise. the root cause problem is a lack of jobs and offshore in that has gone unchecked since 2000. if i do not have a job, i cannot contribute to my country. if i do not have a job, i cannot pursue life, liberty, and have it is. i cannot raise my child or pay for my house her i cannot do anything because there is no revenue coming in. all i hear are the republicans wining about the upper 2% not having their golf money. host: laura calling in from austin, texas. earlier we talked but the bush tax cuts and whether they were indeed intended to be temporary or not. the loopholes, are they intended to be temporary? are t
should not worry. host: democrats line. laura. caller: i'm a 49-year-old african american. back in the day my parents used to give me this thing called father john. they made sure they gave us our vaccination, however i have learned that bad stuff builds up in -- that stuff buildup in the immune system. i also take cod liver oil. my daughter thinks that is the worst stuff, but she has never had the flu. i think sometimes we forget there were things we did not have in the past, and the things that people were taking to keep people alive, and just with the air we breathed now, it is dangerous. people could reflect on some of the things that old people take back in the day, like cod liver oil, which is still very cheap. you can build your immune system at an early age because he did not have to worry about the flu shot later on. i have a 16-year-old was never had the flu. maybe she had the sniffles when she was an infant. host: dr. friedman, do you want to start? guest: good nutrition is important, and vitamin d, which is in cod liver oil, could reduce your ability to be infected.
and editorial associates. jerry, buffalo news and former national press club president. laura lee, producer, npr. kim taylor, and james's wife. donna, usa today, former national press club presidents. marylou donohue, she organized today's event. john crumpler, guest of the speaker. former president of the national press club. mark bueno. \[applause] thank you for joining us today. i really do not need to introduce james taylor to you in that we all feel that we know him and his music. but i will take a moment to remind you of how and why we have come to feel we know him. mr. taylor's music embodies the art of song writing at its most personal and universal. he is a master read describing specific situations in a way that resonates with people from everywhere. for more than 40 years, he has been articulating moments of the pain and joy and letting his listeners know they are not alone. james taylor has sold close to 100 million albums and his career. that is a very big number. look up to the stars on a clear night, that is what 100 million looks like. he has sung in locations by carnegie hall, f
with that. those are the important issues we have to deal with. host: laura, welcome to "washington journal." caller: happy holidays to everybody. i am doing research on poverty. the u.s. census bureau is one of the best places to go. poverty is related to the number one group -- marriage is a healthy boundaries that we should be having the government encouraged because it drops the probability of child poverty by 80%. that is a staggering statistic. those homes with absent fathers also have higher incidence of criminal behavior and higher incidence of school dropout rates, drug and alcohol abuse and emotional problems. it is time with all of these statistics that we get to the policy of encouraging that. you would think this president would have a government response to that. host: your final point? caller: we talk about the racial component. blacks account for 13% of the population. they will have higher poverty statistics. there is much higher of black as a percentage of the population. host: laura from pennsylvania, thanks. guest: there are lots of perspectives here in washington about
behind the biggest tax breaks. host: laura tweeted in, raise everyone's rates a little rather than some a lot. next call, carl from kansas, line for independents. caller: i think we need to quit worrying about the taxes and go well for reform. i know it later in kansas who has three kids -- a lady here in kansas who has three kids. all her food, doctor bills, prescriptions -- she doesn't pay any taxes. how does she get money back? guest: if you are not working, you're not going to be paying payroll taxes, be paying income taxes if you're not getting money. and then you might get some welfare, and that is the way our system works, i guess people might think that would be cruel to completely get rid of for welfare because what would happen to that woman. on the other hand, a lot of people, more conservative people think that something like welfare discourages work. european countries spend more on anti-poverty programs than we do. we still do have some at the poverty programs. -- anti-poverty programs. host: a tweet, what happened to the financial transaction tax? guest: it is popular amo
and not tax that. they're definitely reasons and rationales behind the biggest tax breaks. host: laura tweeted in, raise everyone's rates a little rather than some a lot. next call, carl from kansas, line for independents. caller: i think we need to quit worrying about the taxes and go for welfare reform. i know a lady here in kansas who has three kids. all her food, doctor bills, prescriptions -- she doesn't pay any taxes. how does she get money back? guest: if you are not working, you're not going to be paying payroll taxes, be paying income taxes if you're not getting money. and then you might get some welfare. and that is the way our system works, i guess people might think that would be cruel to completely get rid of for welfare because, what would happen to that woman? on the other hand, a lot of people, more conservative people think that something like welfare discourages work. european countries spend more on anti-poverty programs than we do. we still do have some anti- poverty programs. host: a tweet, what happened to the financial transaction tax? guest: it is popular among liberals
it's a good idea. host: laura, republican caller from lansing, michigan. caller: yes, all these deductions and cuts and things, i have never seen anything done to ceo pay, which is exorbitant. i think possibly we could recuperates a money if we took a minuscule amount from wall street, a half cent for trade or something. i liked the two person discussion you had yesterday, reminded me of c-span of old. i would like to see legislators get paid for the hours they work, nor for they are there for a couple days and then they are gone and then they go talk to their constituents and they'll come back with a sun tan. so we know their constituents are all in florida. guest: with ceo pay, years ago there was a tax on any salary over $1 million. that was abolished in the george bush era. there is a new say on pay provision in the dodd-frank financial reform law that gives shareholders a little more veto power over the ceo's pay package. there's not much congress can do on that is directly because if the private sector. the tax on stock trades, there's a proposal for that. this has b
and exercise cultural sensitivities. but you want to make sure they are realistic scenarios. host: laura asks, why is it anything done after the issuance of gao reports? guest: in most cases, action is taken in response to our recommendations. one of the things that we track globally as a percentage of our recommendations that are implemented. every year, it is about 75%, which is a good track record. more specifically to the realm of dhs grand program and a report that was issued in 2011, we recommended to congress that it consider cutting funding for dhs grant programs until dhs is better prepared to determine the overall impact and success of the programs. congress took us up on that. host: next call from indiana. caller: i would ask c-span to urge triland to come back to fridays. we miss him much. -- brian wham to come back to fridays. we miss him very much. it seems we are on collapse over of a security that we are being provided with, whether the marines, navy, coast guard, fbi, cia, and s.a., a local police enforcement, code enforcement, sheriff, highway patrol, national guard, airport
, -- pozner, jessica rekos, avielle richman, laura rousseau, mary cher lack, victoria soto, benjamin wheeler, and allison wyatt. we're going to remember those people for a long time in newtown. we're going to grieve with them and their families. we're also going to take their memories, the beauty of those kids, the heroism of those adults and let it point us, let it point the strong, close-knit community of newtown, connecticut, let it point us to a way that we can survive. with that i'd like to yield to my friend from the third district in connecticut, representative rosa delauro, five minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for five minutes. ms. delauro: i thank the gentleman and i thank him for the depth of his feeling and the work that he has done over the last several days to help bring some solace and peace to families who have been so struck by the devastation in newtown, connecticut. i strongly support this resolution and condemn, as my colleagues do, the vicious attack at the sandy hook elementary school and commemorate our students and children who were struc
money, everything gets better. host: laura is up next from venice, florida, on the republican line. caller: i am retired nurse and i was agency-based, so i was allowed to go into hundreds of different health care settings. not one of these politicians are addressing medicaid. even the republicans. the people who have worked in this country have paid all their lives and worked for their social security and medicare. that's a savings a plan a savings tax. it did not return interest. it invaded that funds for welfare and for medicaid, for people in this country who are not poor. you have drug addicts, alcoholics, and morbidly obese people who are killing themselves purposely, many of them who have children that are brain damaged from their behavior. you have people in the health care system over and over and over again at the public's expense, after layer after layer of services that people are not even aware of. host: what should congress do to address this issue? is now the time? caller: absolutely, because of this fiscal cliff. the working, responsible citizens of this country havi
benefit increases. a general outline of the president's proposal. laura is joining us from florida. independent line. caller: good morning. i just don't believe it is still going on. i cannot believe that because we saw how trickle-down affected not work and we are trying to go back to the clinton years when it did work and they don't want any part of it. i don't understand it, when something works, go with it. guest: a very pragmatic approach that sometimes in congress we have difficult getting towards period absolutely right. as a democrat active in the new democratic coalition, more moderate democrats. for us as moderate democrats, it is kind of a back to the future moment. the new coalition started in the mid-1990s in the clinton administration. the new dems were part of helping to put together the budget package that resulted in surpluses in the late 1990's. i say it is a back to the future moment because modern dems are in the same position now to be able to help craft a balanced longer-term deficit reduction approach that not everyone will like. there will be plenty of thing
associates. jerry, buffalo news and former national press club president. laura lee, producer, npr. kim taylor, and james's wife. donna, usa today, former national press club presidents. marylou donohue, she organized today's event. john crumpler, guest of the speaker. former president of the national press club. mark bueno. [applause] thank you for joining us today. i really do not need to introduce james taylor to you in that we all feel that we know him and his music. but i will take a moment to remind you of how and why we have come to feel we know him. mr. taylor's music embodies the art of song writing at its most personal and universal. he is a master read describing specific situations in a way that resonates with people from everywhere. for more than 40 years, he has been articulating moments of the pain and joy and letting his listeners know they are not alone. james taylor has sold close to 100 million albums and his career. that is a very big number. look up to the stars on a clear night, that is what 100 million looks like. he has sung in locations by carnegie hall, fenway
scenarios. host: laura asks, why is it anything done after the issuance of gao reports? piece she says, good reports that lead to no actions. guest: in most cases, action is taken in response to our recommendations. one of the things that we track globally as a percentage of our recommendations that are implemented. every year, it is about 75%, which is a good track record. more specifically to the realm of dhs grand program and a report that was issued in 2011, we recommended to congress that it consider cutting funding for dhs grant programs until dhs is better prepared to determine the overall impact and success of the programs. congress took us up on that. host: anthony, mount sinai, new york. caller: i would ask c-span to urge brian lamm to come back to fridays. we miss him very much. it seems we are on collapse over of a security that we are being provided with, whether the marines, navy, coast guard, fbi, cia, and s.a., a local police enforcement, code enforcement, sheriff, highway patrol, national guard, airport and transportation security, board patrol, fire marshal -- i mean, is an
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)